Gertrude Lyons ‘06

Gertrude Lyons ‘06 (Midwest, MA) wrote about the importance of allowing children to express their emotions in a parenting article in MindBodyGreen. She encourages parents to validate their kids and allow children to embody all emotions (responsibly) in order to prepare them for the ups and downs they will face in their lives. Many parents curb their children’s emotional expression for a number of reasons including societal pressure, their own family of origin’s perceptions of emotional expression, and unresolved events from our pasts. In her article, Lyons stresses the importance of raising our self-awareness of historical triggers and healing the challenges and traumas of our past. She goes on to explain the sources of our anger and lays out a three step process to approach our childrens’ emotions with grace, validations, and reinforcement. Read the full article here.

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Gwynne Garfinkle ‘06

Gwynne Garfinkle’s ‘06 (Antioch University Los Angeles, MFA in Creative Writing) piece, “Sinking, Singing,” was reprinted by Mermaids Monthly.

Theresa Daskalakis ‘14

Theresa Daskalakis ‘14 (Antioch University Los Angeles, BA) had a piece, “Silent Night,” appear in Tipping the Scales. 

Jeri Frederickson ‘18

Jeri Frederickson’s ‘18 (Antioch University Los Angeles, MFA in Creative Writing) chapbook You Are Not Lost will be published by Finishing Line Press on October 1, 2021.

Jesus Francisco Sierra ‘18

Jesus Francisco Sierra ‘18 (Antioch University Los Angeles, MFA in Creative Writing) was accepted into and attended a two-week residency at Mesa Refuge. His essay, “Twelve Grapes,” was published in the Write Now! SF Bay anthology Essential Truths: The Bay Area in Color.

Mary Birnbaum ‘17

Mary Birnbaum’s ‘17 (Antioch University Los Angeles, MFA in Creative Writing) essay, “Everything Was Wild, No One Was a Stranger,” was a 2021 Hunger Mountain Creative Nonfiction Prize finalist.

Rebecca Kuder ‘01

Rebecca Kuder’s ‘01 (Antioch University Los Angeles, MFA in Creative Writing) essay, “A Trampoline,” was published in Los Angeles Review of Books.

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