An abstract cell represented as an object of dots in pink and green.

Advancing Healthcare for the Common Good with Stephanie Fox

Sitting in a lecture hall in 2007, one thing Stephanie Fox didn’t want to hear when she started studying to be a therapist was that many people leave the field after 18 months. “I experienced that as quite shocking,” she says. Just a few months into a three year program, the math wasn’t adding up to her if that was true. At the time, she wondered, “If I’m going to be in school longer than I might actually be in the field, how is this worth it?” 

David Lawrence on a green textured background

David Lawrence Named Dayton Public Schools Next Superintendent

“Two days ago, I made a decision to send 15,000 people home,” says David Lawrence. There was a tornado on the horizon, but still, calling off class for an entire school district was a hard decision to make. Lawrence, a graduate of the PhD in Leadership and Change program and the new superintendent of Dayton Ohio Public Schools, had to consider the impact on students, parents, and the staff that he now leads. 

A group of people smiling and posing for a photo in a well-lit room with a pleasant ambiance.

In Bhutan, Collaborating to Ethically Preserve an Indigenous Bioculture 

In 2017, Dawn Murray, a Professor in the Environmental Studies Department and Director of the BS in Environmental Studies, Sustainability, and Sciences, traveled to the Kingdom of Bhutan by invitation from the Monpa people to collaborate with them to document the knowledge of their last community healer, Ap Tawla. Ap Tawla, who was in his 80s, feared that his death would mark the extinction of much of the Monpa people’s collective wisdom, which like a braid reaching back in time, connects them with their ancestors. 

Sally Johnstone

A Q&A With Sally Johnstone About Joining Antioch’s Board of Governors

Sally M. Johnstone has spent her career improving the quality, accessibility, and affordability of post-secondary education for adults. She helped design and launch Western Governors University, which uses an innovative, competency-based education model that allows adult students to take advantage of the knowledge they already have to decrease the time it takes them to earn a degree.

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With Collective Traumas Becoming More Common, One Leader Studies Their Impacts on Black Mental Health Practitioners

In 2018, Chanté Meadows stood on a TEDx stage and addressed a problem that’s central to her career: why isn’t mental health treated as being equally important as physical health? In this instance, she was speaking specifically about how this pattern affects the Black community that she’s part of. Meadows outlined stigmas she often heard associated with mental healthcare. Friends and neighbors would say, “I’m going to just go to Jesus and pray about it.”

Kate Evarts in her classroom. A diverse group of individuals sitting at tables in a classroom, engaged in a learning environment.

For Kate Evarts, Relationships Are “The Key to Working Toward Social and Racial justice”

Kate Evarts incorporates the principles of social justice into every aspect of her work. This is a practice she has carried from her time earning a PsyD in Clinical Psychology at Antioch’s New England campus all the way to today, when she serves as Core Faculty and Director of Student Affairs in that same PsyD program.

Emma Lombardi

For Emma Lombardi, Individualized Study Meant Listening to Her Ancestors

For Emma Lombardi, Individualized Study Meant Listening to Her Ancestors 

As she picked up the phone to call the main office of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians, Emma Lombardi felt restless and nervous. This was the first time she called the tribal offices for reasons other than logistics. Even more nerve-wracking, this was her first attempt to connect with a part of her heritage and culture that she felt estranged from…

Caryn Park

Advocating to Center Equity and Cultural Awareness in Social Emotional Learning

When Caryn Park was a small child, her parents moved the family from South Korea, where she was born, to the U.S. so that they could pursue their education. While her parents were international students, Park found herself enrolled in a public school classroom in a small midwestern town. She had to learn the language, and she also had to learn, she explains today, “this whole different way of being, of relating to other people.” She learned English so well that she forgot how to speak Korean.

A bearded man smiling inside a bomb shelter.

The Nonprofit Innovator Who Moved to Wartime Ukraine (But Kept Teaching Online) 

It was a feeling more than a reason that compelled David Greco to pack his apartment into a storage unit and buy a one-way ticket to Kyiv, Ukraine, in May 2023. The memories of crouching beneath his elementary school desk during nuclear drills amid heightened tensions between the United States and the former Soviet Union flashed back to him.

An illustration of cells dividing.

Opioids Kill 100,000 a Year. For This Methadone Advocate, “Each and Every One of Those Deaths Was Preventable.”

“For somebody with substance use disorder in the U.S., there is only one story,” says Kathy Eggert. “That we believe people are not capable of self-agency and decision-making in a healthy way.” Eggert doesn’t believe that story, though, and she’s spent her career working against this narrative to provide care to people who use opioids through methadone maintenance treatment in ways that respect their humanity.